Services & Hot Courses

Hot Courses

Module 3 : Endless Aesthetic Persuasion​ ​– How to Present Like a Poet?

July 2020

Don’t Commit Logical Fallacies Like Trump Does! 

(30th July, Thursday, 12noon-1pm) 

If you would like your arguments to appear (truly) convincing, you cannot commit logical fallacies as frequently as Donald Trump does. What’s wrong with speaking uncritically and how to avoid it? 

Aug 2020

 Creating Rhythmic Patterns in Your Presentations 

(13th August, Thursday, 12noon-1pm) 

Fancy sounding like Barack Obama when you present in front of colleagues and clients? There are several structural devices you can employ in your speeches to create a stronger sense of rhythm and impact that would certainly impress your audience. 

Sep 2020

Polish Your Rhetoric with Hyperbole, Meiosis, and Litotes 

(24th September, Thursday, 5pm-6pm) 

Know nothing about these Greek terms? No worries! These terms look harder than they really are. I will show you how to use these euphemistic figures of speech in your daily conversations. 

Module 2 : Ceaseless English Grammar and Academic Writing

July 2020

What is a Phrase? What is a Clause? Are They the Same? 

(22nd July, Wednesday, 10am-11am) 

The concepts of “phrase” and “clause” are building blocks of constructing grammatical sentences. If you can’t master their functions, your grammar would forever be wrong. 

Aug 2020

Do You Know How to Use Semicolon in a Non-Chinglish Way? 

(12th August, Wednesday, 10am-11am) 

Semicolon in English is not used in the same ways as it is in Chinese! Don’t use semicolons when you create a list! Oh…then how shall it be used? 

Sep 2020

Why Do You Always Write Run-On Sentences without Knowing It? 

(16th September, Wednesday, 5pm-6pm) 

Wait…What? In fact, what are run-on sentences? How detrimental would it be if I keep writing run-on sentences? 

Module 1 : Timeless Literary and Graphological Analysis

July 2020

What are the Differences between Formal Features and Stylistic Features? 

(20th July, Monday, 2pm-3pm) 

Exam instructions always ask you to analyze formal and stylistic features of unseen texts. Do you really know what they are? If you’re given, say, a comic strip to analyze, what could be the formal and stylistic features you need to comment on? 

What do “Perspectives” mean in Literature? 

(27th July, Monday, 2pm-3pm) 

In order to be a proficient analyst, you need to first understand the four major theoretical perspectives that are the central knowledge questions in the arts. How could this understanding help me write better commentaries in literature? 

Past paper illustrations will focus on literary texts like prose and poetry.

Aug 2020

Major Types of Formal Features 

(3rd August, Monday, 2pm-3pm) 

Analyzing the “form” of language and/or literature could be a pain. Different text types have different forms — which ones should I focus on? 

What do “Perspectives” mean in Language and Literature? 

(10th August, Monday, 2pm-3pm) 

In order to be a proficient analyst, you need to first understand the four major theoretical perspectives that are the central knowledge questions in the arts. How could this understanding help me write better commentaries in language and literature? 

Past paper illustrations will focus on media texts like opinion columns and political cartoons.

Sep 2020

Major Types of Stylistic Features 

(7th September, Monday, 5pm-6pm) 

There are even more stylistic features than formal features. What does it mean by an author’s style ​actually? 

What do “Perspectives” mean in Theory of Knowledge? 

(21st September, Monday, 5pm-6pm) 

If you want to score an “A” in TOK, you MUST investigate multiple perspectives (as indicated in the marking rubric). What is the role of perspectives in knowledge? How could I incorporate this investigation into my TOK presentation and essay?